Youth and Family Services

    Results: 26

  • Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Units (7)
    RM-3300.6600-050

    Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Units

    RM-3300.6600-050

    Programs offered in special units of general acute care hospitals that provide diagnostic and treatment services for adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17 who have acute psychiatric disorders, require hospitalization for maximum benefit, and who may be a threat to themselves, to their families or to others if left in the community or placed in a less restrictive treatment setting. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge.
  • Adolescent/Youth Counseling (82)
    RP-1400.8000-050

    Adolescent/Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-050

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17, who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbance, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness. The programs may help youth troubled by low self-esteem, social isolation, peer pressure, bullying, school performance issues, truancy, anger management issues, family problems, grief and loss, sexual promiscuity, sexually transmitted disease, alcohol or drug addiction, eating disorders, oppositional and defiant behaviors, depression and anxiety, suicidal thoughts or other difficult issues.
  • Adoption Services (3)
    PH-0300

    Adoption Services

    PH-0300

    Programs that participate in arranging permanent homes under new legal parentage for individuals whose birth parents are unable or unwilling to provide for their care. Included are programs that provide counseling and assistance for people who decide to relinquish their children for adoption or arrange for an independent adoption; which recruit, select, counsel and match suitable adoptive parents with children who have been relinquished; which assist in the adoption of stepchildren, adults or foreign-born children; which provide foster care for children who have been relinquished for adoption but not yet placed; and/or which assist people who are adopted to locate their birth parents and birth parents to locate the children they relinquished.
  • Child Advocacy Centers (1)
    FT-3000.1450

    Child Advocacy Centers

    FT-3000.1450

    Programs that operate centers which facilitate a multidisciplinary approach to the investigation and treatment of child abuse cases. Services generally include videotaped interviews of child abuse victims in safe, child-friendly surroundings to avoid multiple interviews, reduce the trauma of disclosure and preserve statements for court purposes; crisis intervention and emotional support for victims and non-offending family members; forensic medical examinations; psychotherapy services including play therapy, family therapy and individual counseling for parents; support groups; case management; and interdisciplinary review of cases by teams of professionals including law enforcement, children's protective services, prosecution, medical, mental health, victim assistance, and child advocacy personnel.
  • Day/Evening Reporting Centers for Offenders (3)
    FF-0500.1700

    Day/Evening Reporting Centers for Offenders

    FF-0500.1700

    Highly structured non-residential programs which coordinate the supervision of nonviolent offenders from a central location. Offenders are required to report to the center on a daily basis during daytime or evening hours, provide a schedule of their planned activities and participate in designated programs, services and activities. Offenders in day reporting programs who are not required to spend all of their time on site must report in by telephone throughout the day and can expect random phone checks by center staff during the day and at home following curfew. Offenders in evening reporting programs, many of whom are juveniles, are required to report to the center during the period of time in which delinquent activity is most likely to occur, generally three or four in the afternoon to nine in the evening, and participate in a variety of programs, activities and workshops which may address issues such as employment, substance abuse, conflict resolution, life skills development, health and hygiene education, AIDS prevention, parenting skills and teenage pregnancy. Participation in these programs may be a requirement of probation, an alternative to returning to prison for people who have violated the terms and conditions of their probation or parole, constitute a form of pre-trial release or be a requirement for all released offenders at risk for committing additional crimes.
  • Early Head Start (1)
    HD-1800.1800

    Early Head Start

    HD-1800.1800

    A federally-funded child development and family support program that provides early education, health, mental health, nutrition and social services for low-income pregnant women and families with children from birth to age three. Services provided directly or through referral may include prenatal education and parenting classes for pregnant women; child development information; parent/child activities; a home visiting program for families with newborns; early education services in a variety of settings; comprehensive health and mental health services including smoking cessation and substance abuse treatment; coordination with organizations providing early intervention for infants and toddlers with disabilities; assistance in obtaining income support, housing or emergency cash; and transportation to program services.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (6)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Early Intervention for Mental Illness (7)
    RR-1800

    Early Intervention for Mental Illness

    RR-1800

    Programs that identify and provide treatment for individuals whose personal condition and social experiences could potentially produce mental, emotional or social dysfunctions with the objective of preventing their development; or which conduct general screening efforts to identify and treat children who have emerging problems to ensure the best possible prognosis.
  • Family Counseling (90)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Preservation Programs (3)
    PH-2360.2350

    Family Preservation Programs

    PH-2360.2350

    Programs that provide a variety of short-term, intensive, home-based intervention services for families experiencing a crisis that is so severe that children are at imminent risk for placement outside the family setting. Services, which are aimed at ameliorating the underlying causes of family dysfunction, are generally time-limited, of fairly short duration and available on a 24-hour basis. Also included are other family preservation program models whose programs vary in terms of the population served, the level of intensity of services provided and the length of services. The objective of family preservation programs is to preserve the family as a unit and prevent unnecessary placement of the children in foster care, a group home, an inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment program, a residential training school or other alternative living arrangement.
  • Family Support Centers/Outreach (11)
    PH-2360.2400

    Family Support Centers/Outreach

    PH-2360.2400

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support the healthy development of families, improve family interaction skills and help fragile families to resolve their problems at a pre-crisis stage before they become unmanageable. Services may be center-based or provided on an outreach basis to families who are initially reluctant to seek support and generally target the specific needs of a particular community. Included may be self-sufficiency programs which help families break the cycle of poverty by addressing the barriers to self-sufficiency; early child development and school success programs; programs which address the needs of teen parents; programs which target parents at risk for becoming abusive; programs for families with children who have special developmental needs and programs that focus on the maternal and child health care needs of first-time, expectant women whose babies are at high risk for low birth weight and infant mortality.
  • Federated Giving Programs (1)
    TD-1200.1800

    Federated Giving Programs

    TD-1200.1800

    Joint fund-raising efforts usually administered by a nonprofit "umbrella" organization like United Way, United Jewish Appeal or the United Negro College Fund which, in turn, distributes the contributed funds to several nonprofit agencies.
  • Foster Parent/Family Recruitment (3)
    PH-2400.2000

    Foster Parent/Family Recruitment

    PH-2400.2000

    Programs that identify and enlist people who are willing to provide foster care for dependent children who have been removed from their homes because of abuse, neglect or abandonment and need an alternative family living arrangement, or for children or adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional problems or multiple disabilities who are unable to live with their birth families or in an independent setting. Programs that recruit families to provide foster care for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • General Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Programs (4)
    FN-1500.3600-250

    General Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Programs

    FN-1500.3600-250

    Programs that focus broadly on juvenile delinquency prevention rather than replicating a specific approach such as Midnight Basketball that was developed elsewhere and has wide name recognition. These programs generally include education, recreation and community involvement activities in a variety of combinations but have as common objectives reducing known risk factors for delinquent behavior and giving young people more attractive alternatives.
  • Group Homes for Dependent Children (1)
    PH-6300.2500

    Group Homes for Dependent Children

    PH-6300.2500

    Facilities that provide an alternative living environment for children and youth who have been neglected, abused or abandoned or have had contact with the juvenile justice system, who are unable to live with their own family or a foster family and who would benefit from a professionally supervised, structured group environment. In some situations, particularly with older youth, a group home is the only option available. Group homes for dependent children are generally licensed by the state.
  • Juvenile Diversion (4)
    FF-0500.1800-350

    Juvenile Diversion

    FF-0500.1800-350

    Community-based programs that provide comprehensive social services for individuals younger than age 18 who have committed a minor offense and are directed to participate in a diversion program as an alternative to arrest, prosecution or, in some cases, sentencing for the offense. Most juvenile diversion programs do an assessment of the individual's needs and provide and/or coordinate the delivery of the necessary services which may include individual, group or family counseling, substance abuse counseling, supervised recreational activities, vocational guidance, tutorial services and supplemental referrals for other needs.
  • Life Skills Education (4)
    PH-6200.4600

    Life Skills Education

    PH-6200.4600

    Programs that offer training which focuses on the knowledge and skills an individual may need to live independently or make a successful transition to independent living. Participants may include runaway youth who are living on their own, youth who because of age can no longer be maintained in foster care, new widows, victims of domestic abuse, people who have previously been homeless, and others who have lived in an environment in which decision making and responsibilities of daily living have been handled by another as well as people currently living independently who want to be more effective. Training may address job search and retention, money management, insurance, taxes, rental agreements, vehicle purchase, nutrition, home management, health care, legal emancipation for teens and other similar topics.
  • Marriage Counseling (1)
    RP-1400.8000-500

    Marriage Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-500

    Programs that provide emotional support, problem solving assistance, and guidance for one or both married or cohabiting partners who are having problems with their relationship and need assistance to identify the root of their difficulty and explore alternative resolutions with the objective of enhancing the relationship for both partners. Counseling may be available in a variety of settings and may include individual or group counseling for one or both of the partners, conjoint counseling and encounter-type experiences for groups of couples who are experiencing marital problems and/or who want to enhance their marriages.
  • Mental Health Evaluation (1)
    RP-5000

    Mental Health Evaluation

    RP-5000

    Programs that provide screening, diagnostic and treatment planning services for people who are experiencing acute or chronic psychiatric problems. Included is a continuum of assessment services ranging from a comprehensive psychiatric or psychological evaluation to the administration of one or a combination of psychological tests to examine a particular personality variable. Services may be provided in a variety of settings including hospitals and community-based clinics.
  • Outpatient Mental Health Facilities (2)
    RM-6500

    Outpatient Mental Health Facilities

    RM-6500

    Programs that provide walk-in, walk-out diagnostic and treatment services for children, adolescents and/or adults who have acute or chronic psychiatric disorders but do not need 24-hour care; and/or provide counseling services for individuals, couples, families and extended family groups who may be experiencing difficulty resolving personal or interpersonal conflicts or making personal adjustments to stressful life situations such as separation, divorce, widowhood, loss of a child, poor health, unemployment, family violence, delinquency or substance abuse.
  • Parental Visitation Facilitation (3)
    PH-6000

    Parental Visitation Facilitation

    PH-6000

    Programs that facilitate parental visits with minor children in situations where the court has established conditions for the visit.
  • Parenting Education (1)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • School Based Integrated Services (1)
    PH-2360.8000

    School Based Integrated Services

    PH-2360.8000

    Programs, often offered directly by schools, that develop collaborative partnerships with public and private community agencies to meet the mental health, juvenile justice, social service and academic needs of school children whose struggles with multiple problems including poor physical or mental health, inadequate nutrition, substance abuse, family dysfunction or insufficient community support are affecting their educational performance. The purpose of these programs is to develop an integrated services delivery system through which existing resources are coordinated and made available to children and youth, their parents and family members at or near the school site.
  • Special Education Classes/Centers (1)
    HH-8000.8000

    Special Education Classes/Centers

    HH-8000.8000

    Programs that enroll exceptional learners for the majority of the school day in special classes or centers that are located on regular school sites and which group pupils who have similar instructional needs. Special classes and centers serve pupils who have intensive needs that cannot be met in a less restrictive learning environment.
  • Volunteer Recruitment/Placement (1)
    PW-9000

    Volunteer Recruitment/Placement

    PW-9000

    Programs that identify individuals who have chosen to work on a full or part-time basis without remuneration in one of the human service fields and which systematically evaluate the skills, talents and personalities of recruited volunteers and match them with human service agencies that need voluntary support.
  • Youth Development (1)
    PS-9800

    Youth Development

    PS-9800

    Programs that provide opportunities for children and youth to participate in a wide range of recreational, cultural, social and civic activities through membership in clubs, scout troops and other youth groups whose purpose is to help youngsters develop their potential and grow into healthy, educated, responsible and productive adults.